Defending your right to control your personal information

Campaigns

My Health Record

This is the latest brand name for the Australian government-controlled online copy of parts of your health information. From 2012 until 2015 it was called the ‘Personally-Controlled Electronic Health Record’ (PCEHR). It is not designed for patients, and it is not designed for health care professionals. And it’s being foisted on you.

The 2016 Census

APF led the fight against the retention of identifiers with Census data. The ABS conducted an internal assessment, avoided engaging with the public, ignored the evidence provided to it, implemented a system with abysmal security precautions, crashed on Census night – yet no-one was sacked.

Australia Card (again)

The descendants of the public servants who tried to impose the Australia Card scheme in 1987 keep trying to achieve the same result. The Access Card, the mygov Portal, and national document and photograph ‘verification’ services are just some of the attempts that the APF has worked to defeat.

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News

David Glance, University of Western Australia Australians are increasingly concerned about how companies handle their personal data, especially online. Faced with the increasing likelihood that this data will be compromised, either through cyber attacks or mishandling, companies are now being forced into a more comprehensive approach to collecting and protecting customers’ personal data. The question… Read More

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A commitment to share the biometric data of most Australians – including your driving licence photo – agreed at Thursday’s Council of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting will result in a further erosion of our privacy.
That sharing is not necessary. It will be costly. But will it save us from terrorism? Not all, although it will give people a false sense of comfort.

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Australia’s leading privacy and civil liberties organisations condemn the decision by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) to provide all images from state and territory driver’s licence databases to the federal National Facial Biometric Matching Capability.
These organisations are the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch, Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, NSW Council for Civil Liberties, Liberty Victoria, South Australian Council for Civil Liberties and Electronic Frontiers Australia.

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Attorney General George Brandis declared “Villain” by Access Now for comments undermining encryption

Today, Access Now recognizes Attorney General George Brandis as a Villain among the annual Heroes and Villains Award recipients for his comments in opposition to strong digital security tools like encryption. As a leading official representing Australia in the notorious “Five Eyes” partnership, Attorney General Brandis has pushed publicly for requirements for companies to implement measures to allow law enforcement to bypass encryption protections for exceptional access to digital content. This type of access has been repeatedly demonstrated to undermine digital security globally, including and especially for the users in marginalized communities.

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Are you going to kiss goodbye to your privacy every time you use a bus, train, or City Cat in Brisbane?
The Australian Privacy Foundation, the nation’s civil society organisation concerned with privacy, today strongly condemned proposals for biometric scanning of people using public transport in Brisbane.
Foundation spokesperson Dr Monique Mann said “comprehensive scanning will not work. It is not necessary. It is contrary to the right to privacy expected by all Australians”.

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Earlier this week, a global coalition of civil society organisations, including the Australian Privacy Foundation, submitted to the Council of Europe its comments on how to protect human rights when developing new rules on cross-border access to electronic evidence (“e-evidence”). The Council of Europe is currently preparing an additional protocol to the Cybercrime Convention. European Digital Rights (EDRi)’s Executive Director Joe McNamee handed the comments over to Mr. Alexander Seger, the Executive Secretary of the Cybercrime Convention Committee (T-CY) of the Council of Europe.

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